Art & Design

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Computing

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Design Technology

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English

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Geography

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History

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Mathematics

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Music

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PSHE

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Science

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Spanish

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ART and DESIGN

Curriculum Intent:
The school uses a variety of teaching and learning styles in art and design lessons, through a mixture of whole-class teaching and individual or group activities. Our principal aim is to develop the children’s knowledge, skills and understanding in art and design ensuring that the children develop skills for exploring, developing their own ideas, evaluating and improving their creative work. Teachers draw attention to good examples of individual performance as models for the other children. They encourage children to evaluate their own ideas and methods, and the work of others, and say what they think and feel about them. We give children the opportunity within lessons to work on their own and collaborate with others, on projects in two and three dimensions and on different scales. Children also have the opportunity to use a wide range of materials and resources, including ICT.

  • Enable children to record from first-hand experience and from imagination, and to select their own ideas to use in their work.
  • Develop creativity and imagination through a range of complex activities.
  • Improve the children’s ability to control materials, tools and techniques.
  • Increase their critical awareness of the roles and purposes of art and design in different times and cultures.
  • Develop increasing confidence in the use of visual and tactile elements and materials.
  • Foster an enjoyment and appreciation of the visual arts and a knowledge of artists, craftspeople and designers.

Curriculum Implementation:
We recognise the fact that we have children of differing ability in all our classes, and so we provide suitable learning opportunities for all children by matching the challenge of the task to the ability of the child. We achieve this through a range of strategies:

  • Setting common tasks that are open-ended and can have a variety of responses.
  • Setting tasks of increasing difficulty where not all children complete all tasks.
  • Grouping children by ability and setting different tasks for each group.
  • Providing a range of challenges with different resources.
  • Using additional adults to support the work of individual children or small groups.

We plan the activities in art and design so that they build upon the prior learning of the children. While we give children of all abilities opportunity to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding, we also build planned progression into the scheme of work, so that there is an increasing challenge for the children as they move up through the school. The Art work undertaken is linked to the medium and long term planning.
As a school we also provide an Art afterschool club to Key Stage 2 children and we have an Art week every year where we focus on what particular artist.

Curriculum Impact:

  • Art encourages children to ask and answer questions about the starting points for their work.
  • Children have the opportunity to compare ideas, methods and approaches in their own work and that of other children, and to say what they think and feel about them.
  • Art and design contributes to the teaching of mathematics in our school by giving opportunities to develop the children’s understanding of shape and space through work in two and three dimensions.
  • Children use computing software to explore shape, colour and pattern in their work.
  • Art contributes to the teaching of some elements of personal, social and health education and citizenship. The children discuss how they feel about their own work and the methods and approaches used by others, whether within their culture or a different one.
  • Art offers opportunities to support the social development of our children through the way we expect them to work with each other in lessons.

Computing

The National Curriculum (2014) states for computing:

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

What do we want our children to walk away with at the end of the year?

  • Promote an enjoyment for computing
  • Increased confidence using a computer, keyboard and mouse including safe use of the internet.
  • A clear understanding of online safety within school and the home.

Curriculum Implementation:

To ensure this happens we will:

  • Set up a lunchtime E-Cadet online safety club where children across the school will promote online safety within school and their own classrooms.
  • Arrange assemblies and use contacts such as the police and NSPCC to deliver workshops and keep children, parents and teachers updated with relevant information.
  • Provide online safety workshops for both children and parents to ensure they know how to safely use the internet.
  • Ensure children have computing lessons including the basic skills needed in order to make progress.

Curriculum Impact:

What do we want the impact to be?

  • Children will be secure with their awareness of online safety and know what to do if anything inappropriate online occurs.
  • E-cadets will be confident and approachable to help peers.
  • Planning scrutiny to ensure most staff are teaching good quality online safety.
  • Analysis of data to ensure progress is being made.

Design and Technology

Curriculum Intent:

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils are taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They will work in a range of relevant contexts, (for example the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment).

Curriculum Implementation
Through a variety of creative and practical activities, we teach the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in the process of designing and making. The children work in a range of relevant contexts.

When designing and making, the children are taught:

To design

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

To make

  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing) accurately.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

To evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • Understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Technical Knowledge

  • Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • Understand and use mechanical systems in their products.
  • Understand and use electrical systems in their products.
  • Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Cooking and Nutrition

  • Use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes .
  • Understand where food comes from.
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques
  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

Curriculum Impact

We ensure the children:

  • Develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • Build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users and critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others.
  • Understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. Children will design and make a range of products. A good quality finish will be expected in all design and activities made appropriate to the age and ability of the child.

Children learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.


English

At Junction Farm School we recognise the importance of language in the social, emotional and intellectual development of children. We aim to develop pupils’ abilities within an integrated programme of speaking and listening, reading and writing. Pupils will be given opportunities to interrelate the requirements of English within a broad and balanced curriculum. Opportunities will be given to consolidate and practise ‘taught‘ Literacy skills in cross curricular activities.

Children enter school with varying levels of language skills. We extend and develop these skills providing them with a variety of rich, language experiences. We recognise the need for differentiation and progression in the tasks we set in order to enable each child to develop its potential to the highest degree possible. All literacy teaching will contribute to skill development in the following areas:

  • Speaking and Listening
  • Reading
  • Writing.

Speaking and Listening

We aim that children will:

  • Think critically and logically
  • Order thoughts and express them clearly
  • Develop skills of oracy giving the children confidence and understanding, equipping them for work and leisure
  • Express and justify their feelings and opinions with increasing clarity and effectiveness and respect the opinions of others
  • Adapt their speech to a widening range of purposes and audiences
  • Learn to use the vocabulary and grammar of standard English.

Reading

We aim that children will:

  • Read and write with confidence, fluency, understanding and for enjoyment.
  • Be able to use a full range of reading strategies e.g. phonics, word recognition, graphic knowledge, picture and context clues and higher order reading skills.
  • Have an interest in books and read for enjoyment, to gather information or as a tool for providing them with a wealth of texts and story patterns for their own writing.
  • Develop the skill of silent reading
  • Develop imagination and critical awareness through reading the best examples of traditional and modern literature
  • Have experience of group, shared and individual reading.
  • Use reference materials (including ICT) with confidence and for a range of purposes.

Writing

We aim that children will:

  • Have an interest in words, their meanings and develop a growing vocabulary in spoken and written forms
  • Understand a range of text types and genres – be able to write in a variety of styles and forms appropriate to the situation.
  • Be developing the powers of imagination, inventiveness and critical awareness
  • Have a suitable technical vocabulary to articulate their responses
  • Produce independent pieces of writing using correct punctuation and sentence construction
  • Write extended pieces of text
  • Have knowledge of the work of a range of authors, poets and playwrights
  • To develop a fluid and well formed handwriting style.

Handwriting

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Reading and Phonics

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Geography

Curriculum Intent:

  • To provide the children with a more balanced Geography focus within Topic to ensure coverage is balanced between Geography and History. New topics such as: Volcanoes and Earthquakes, Whitby, China etc.
  • To provide more trips with access to exploring our world.
  • To create and build confidence for staff teaching specific objectives.
  • To develop a thorough assessment procedure and ensure staff are confident teaching and assessing Geography
  • To gain more clarity on what ‘mastery’ Geography consists of
  • To create a culture where children becoming more ‘globally-minded’
  • To improve the consistency of explicit Geography displays in classrooms
  • To bring Geography ‘to life’ across school through ‘Active Geography’
  • To cover or consolidate curriculum objectives through the new topics
  • To analyse data termly
  • Whole school Long term Plan meetings to ensure History and Geography Topics have equal opportunity for coverage.

Curriculum Implementation:

  • To encourage and organise a trips across school (example – Roseberry Topping in Year 5)
  • To carry out a learning walk in each Term (Autumn, Spring, Summer)
  • To collate information and opinion across school through a Staff Questionnaire
  • To research surrounding Mastery in Geography and develop an assessment tool (discuss with History lead)
  • Attend Academy meetings to discuss assessment in Geography
  • Email other contacts surrounding Assessment and Mastery in their schools.
  • To plan a Geography themed week after last year’s success (This year focussing on map skills and creating an exciting and active activity)
  • To order a globe for every classroom ensuring the children can use this as reference on a day to day basis.
  • To order a Geography Teaching book accessible for staff

Curriculum Impact:

  • Overall, Children enjoying new topics through pupil voice.
  • Trips including Roseberry Topping trip carried out with great success
  • Displays have developed through feedback and now evident in classrooms – specifically linked to new Geography topics.

History

History Curriculum

Intent

  • For children to have access to a range of historical resources, such as artefacts and secondary resources.
  • To have a whole school approach to teaching history, enabling us to build on historical skills.
  • For children to experience enquiry-based learning, allowing them to investigate, consider and reflect.
  • For children to celebrate and see the importance of history in their lives.

Implementation

  • To monitor quality first teaching through work scrutiny, planning, acquisition of skills and pupil voice.
  • To have enriched opportunities in and beyond the curriculum through expertise, afterschool clubs and class visits.
  • To gather pupil and staff opinions on history at Junction Farm.
  • To develop a ‘Progression of Skills’ document for all year groups (including EYFS) to ensure knowledge and skills are progressing.
  • To work alongside the Geography subject lead to ensure an enquiry-based approach is taking place throughout all topics.

Impact

  • There should be evidence of the ‘Progression of Skills’ in books.
  • Children should be able to enthusiastically be a part of and discuss their learning journey, using enriched vocabulary and discussion of skills.
  • There should be high attainment and progress for all children, supported through relevant intervention.
  • There should be quality evidence of work across school on display and social media, in order to share with parents and other stakeholders.

Mathematics

At Junction Farm Primary, we intend to ensure high-quality teaching that enables learners to embed and secure knowledge and understanding so that it can be retained, sustained and built upon at each stage of their educational journey.

The National Curriculum (2014) states that three aims of mathematics aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • Become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics
  • Reason mathematically
  • Can solve problems

Children with special educational needs are also expected to make significant progress and work on the curriculum for their year group where possible – interventions/support plans. Gifted and Talented/More Able/Greater Depth children should be given a range of experiences in mathematics to broaden and deepen their understanding, rather than accelerating to the next year group’s objectives.Mathematics within the Early Years is guided by the requirements and recommendations set out in the Early Years ‘Development Matters’ EYFS document – ‘Number’ and ‘Shape, Space and Measure’. Children have a daily specific mathematics lesson where objectives are taught in a broad range of contexts in which children can explore, enjoy, learn, practise and talk about their developing understanding. Once the Early Learning Goals have has been achieved, children are given access to the exceeding statements.To implement the objectives of the Primary National Curriculum, we use ‘Focus Maths’ to assist with planning and progression. A range of other resources, including White Rose Maths Hub, are also used.

Curriculum Implementation:

Early Years :

  • Focusing on fluency, reasoning and problem solving, our intent, at Junction Farm Primary School, is for all children to be working on the curriculum for their year group, sustaining and accelerating individual progress, whilst embedding key mathematical concepts, focussing on depth of understanding and ability to solve problems and reason in a range of situations.
  • Each year group is provided with a long-term plan which maps out aspects across the academic year, in a sustainable and progressive way.
  • A medium-term planning overview for each half term is provided – this highlights the curriculum objective and progressive learning steps.
  • Each week has an objective focus. A pre-learning task is completed independently by all pupils on a Friday – this is then marked and graded E (Emerging), D (Developing) or S (Secure), using agreed criteria.
  • As our intent is ‘teaching for retention’ and to ensure progression, we aim to have as few children as possible in the ‘E’ group. This grading indicates the group the children will be in/level of work they will access for the particular objective, ensuring learning is progressive and specific to the individual child. Groups therefore change weekly and are fluid. ‘E’ and ‘D’ children – focus on ‘practice and consolidation’ (varied fluency) before moving onto ‘deeper understanding’ (problem solving and reasoning) across the week. Children with ‘S’, after some practice and consolidation, focus on ‘deeper understanding’ and ‘working at greater depth’ (problem solving and reasoning).
  • All children should be accessing problem solving and reasoning during the week – we must ensure a balance between fluency, problem solving and reasoning. A post-learning task is then completed on the following Friday. Children are then graded E, D, S, M (Mastery) from this (again, using agreed criteria).
  • Progress should be clear across the week from pre-learning to post-learning task. We must consider pupils prior attainment groups when grading children and considering their weekly ‘gradings’ and targets.
  • Fifteen minute arithmetic sessions take place daily in Key Stage 1 and 2 – focusing on fluency of key number skills and times tables.
  • Mathematical vocabulary is of the utmost importance to a child becoming a fluent and confident mathematician. Once vocabulary has been embedded and secured, it should be revisited and discussed regularly to ensure retention and sustainable progression – this is encouraged daily.
  • To assist with teaching for retention, each year group is provided with a list of ‘curriculum end points’. These areas need focus and recovery in later year groups to ensure a deep and sustainable understanding.
  • We have a clear, coherent calculation policy. The policy aims to ensure consistency and progression. Annually, parents are given a copy of the calculation policy and targets for their child’s year group to ensure consistency between home and school in learning – we communicate regularly and effectively with parents about children’s learning in Mathematics.

Early Years :

  • All children are given ample opportunities to develop their understanding of mathematics through their extended provision, alongside their daily taught lesson. Indoor and outdoor environments are utilised fully to enable children to discover through physical activity and develop understanding of mathematical concepts.
  • Children are given sufficient time, space and encouragement to discover mathematical ideas, concepts and language during child-initiated activities in their own play. They are provided with opportunities to practise and extend their skills in these areas and to gain confidence and competence in their use.

Curriculum Impact:

  • Mathematics is also encouraged at home with the support of parents to address personalised areas of focus through the use of ‘Proud Cloud’ books.
  • To achieve resilient, confident and skilful mathematicians.
  • A consistent approach to mathematics across school.
  • Teaching for retention.
  • Learners make sustained/accelerated progress
  • Learners are able to retain and recall key mathematical strategies and facts.
  • Learners have appropriate and progressive calculation strategies and methods.
  • Learners are able to retain and recall key mathematical vocabulary.

Aims of Mathematics

We aim to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop a positive attitude towards mathematics,  which includes making maths fun and bringing it to life, through the use of Active Maths, x tables Rock Stars, the use of relevant apparatus and maths games.
  • Develop and consolidate basic mathematical skills and become numerically fluent.
  • Promote confidence and competence with numbers and the number system.
  • Develop the ability to solve problems through decision making and reasoning in a range of contexts.
  • Develop a practical understanding of the ways in which information is gathered, presented and interpreted.
  • Explore features of shape and space, and develop measuring skills in a range of contexts.
  • Develop mathematical communication through speaking and listening, practical activities and recording work.
  • Develop an ability to use and apply mathematics across the curriculum and in real life

Music

Music Curriculum

At Junction Farm Primary School, music is an important ingredient in the children’s education. Music is used to develop children’s confidence and imagination. Our children are able to develop skills in listening, composition and performance. Music also plays a great part in our collective worship. Our children are given the chance to perform in concerts, plays, carol services, talent shows and class assemblies. We aim to give every child the opportunity to participate in a structures scheme of musical experiences and develop at their own pace, no matter what their age or ability.

Curriculum Intent:

At Junction Farm, we follow the National Curriculum for music, which aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • Learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Curriculum Implementation:

  • Quality first teaching with opportunity for CPD.
  • Monitoring of the quality of teaching through work scrutiny, planning, acquisition of skills and pupil voice.
  • Enriched opportunities in and beyond the curriculum (expertise, afterschool clubs and class visits).
  • Charanga, online music education resource.
  • Regular performances (Christmas, Easter, End of Year, assemblies)
  • Music assembly
  • Displays
  • Music of the month

Early Years Children will be taught to:

  • Listen to music.
  • Sing songs.
  • Experiment with instruments.
  • Respond to music through actions and independent movement.

Key Stage 1 pupils will be taught to:

  • Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.
  • Play tuned and untuned instruments musically.
  • Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music.
  • Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the interrelated dimensions of music.

Key Stage 2 pupils will be taught to:

  • Sing and play musically with increasing confidence and control. They should develop an understanding of musical composition, organising and manipulating ideas within musical structures and reproducing sounds from aural memory.
  • Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.
  • Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music.
  • Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory.
  • Use and understand staff and other musical notations.
  • Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.
  • Develop an understanding of the history of music.
  • Each child will have the opportunity to learn to play a tuned instrument, currently: Y4 recorders; Y5 cello or violin; Y6 brass instruments.

Curriculum Impact:

  • Evidence of the progression of skills though ability in performance at different levels.
  • To gain experience and skills, drawing on the support of expertise.
  • Children to enthusiastically be a part of and discuss their learning journey, using enriched vocabulary and discussion of skill.
  • High attainment and progress for all children, supported through relevant intervention.
  • Quality evidence of work across school on display and on social media: share with parents and stakeholders.

Key lines of enquiry:

  • Can the children play?
  • Can the children perform?
  • What musical language can the children use?
  • Can the Children respond appropriately to music?

PE

Curriculum Intent:

What do we want our children to walk away with at the end of the year?

  • Children at Junction Farm will have a better understanding about why Physical activity is so important to everyday life.
  • Children will access high quality physical education and this makes a vital contribution to pupils’ physical development and well-being.
  • A broad and balanced physical education curriculum, giving the children an opportunity to experience a range of physical activities and progress and achieve within them.
  • Children will develops a wide range of skills from self-esteem to problem solving.
  • All children will have a minimum of 2 hours high quality Physical Education and sport within a week. Children will also take part in 30 minutes of extra activity within the school day.

Curriculum Implementation:

How will we do this?

  • Quality first teaching with many opportunities for CPD
  • Theory lesson as well as practical lessons
  • Monitoring of the quality of teaching through work scrutiny, planning, acquisition of skills and pupil voice
  • A range of extra-curricular activities
  • Annual sports week
  • Develop progression of skills, knowledge and understanding document
  • Data analysis
  • Monitoring take up from after school clubs
  • Enter a wide range of competitions and festivals

 

Curriculum Impact:

What do we want the impact to be?

  • Evidence of the progression of skills in PE books.
  • To gain a wide range of experiences in different sports
  • Children to enthusiastically talk about PE and sport at school
  • High attainment and progress for all children, supported through relevant intervention.
  • Quality evidence of work across school on display and on social media: share with parents and stakeholders.
  • More children achieving Mastery
  • More children take part in after school clubs in school and outside of school. This will be measured at the end of autumn term. Children not accessing clubs will be targeted to attend a lunch time club
  • Staff feel more confident at teaching different sports within PE. This can be measured by a questionnaire
  • Continue to be successful at Cluster events, Stockton finals and Tees Valley finals

PSHE

INTENT:

What do we want our children to walk away with at the end of the year? Here are our curriculum intentions for the current academic year:

  • At Junction Farm we have implemented the Jigsaw Curriculum, to ensure we are able to provide our children with a broad and balanced curriculum that meets the needs of all pupils. Through this, we promote Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Education (SMSC) as we understand that we have a duty of care to keep our pupils safe, whilst developing positive relationships with themselves and others.
  • Jigsaw holds children at its heart, and enables children understand and value how they fit into and contribute to the world.
  • With a strong emphasis on emotional literacy, building resilience and nurturing mental and physical health, we equip children to use mindfulness, allowing children to advance their emotional awareness, concentration and focus. This is through our PSHE sessions and regular mindfulness assemblies.
  • Children will access high quality PSHE/RSE and this makes a vital contribution to pupils’ emotional development and well-being.
  • Our broad and balanced PSHE/RSE curriculum provides the children with an opportunity to equip them with the knowledge, skills and strategies they may need to overcome challenges they may face as they are growing up.
  • Children will develops a wide range of skills from developing their own self-esteem to problem solving.
  • All children will have access to one lesson of PSHE per week and through our embedded curriculum, will encounter opportunities to connect with one another, develop a calm mind, open their mind to significant topics, they are introduced to new information, concepts and skills, via a range of teaching approaches and activities. They are given the opportunity to use the new information in context and finally, they are then encouraged to reflect on their learning experiences and the progress they have made through their learning journey.
  • Children will be equipped with the knowledge they need as they are growing up and know how to deal with these changes. (Age related).

IMPLEMENTATION:

How we intend this to be implemented:

  • By delivering Jigsaw’s comprehensive Programme for Primary PSHE/SRE, in a, progressive, adapted and fully planned scheme of work, giving children relevant learning experiences to help them navigate their world and to develop positive relationships with themselves and others.
  • During our sessions we will teach the following units:Term 1: Being Me in My World
    Term 2: Celebrating Difference (including anti-bullying)
    Term 3: Dreams and Goals
    Term 4: Healthy Me
    Term 5: Relationships
    Term 6: Changing Me (including Sex Education that is age-appropriate).
  • Each session, we will focus on two Learning Intentions, one specific to Relationships and Health Education (PSHE) and the other designed to develop emotional literacy and social skills. We launch each puzzle with a whole-school assembly to introduce the whole-school theme.
  • We adopt Quality first teaching with opportunities for CPD for staff.
  • Lessons are planned to ensure that pupils of differing abilities, including the most able and SEN , are suitably challenged.
  • Ongoing assessments through our learning journeys will be used to identify where pupils need extra support or intervention.
  • Monitoring of the quality of teaching through work scrutiny, planning, acquisition of skills and pupil voice.
  • Build on the knowledge pupils have previously acquired, including in other subjects, with regular feedback provided on pupil progress.
  • Extra curricular activities will include Well-being Warriors, Yoga sessions and adult Align and Define Sessions. (Currently in training for the latter)

IMPACT:

What do we want the impact to be?

  • Happy, well-rounded children with the tools they need to tackle challenges they may face.
  • Tracked assessment to evidence the impact ensuring that pupils are building on their skills and knowledge over time.
  • Evidence of the progression of skills in PSHE books.
  • Acquisition of a wide range of experiences in different contexts.
  • Children will have a positive approach to PSHE, enjoying sessions and enthusiastically talking about PSHE within school.
  • All children will make encouraged to make progress and will benefit from differentiated sessions.
  • Quality evidence of work across school on display.
  • More children achieving Mastery.
  • Through effective CPD, Staff will feel more confident at teaching different PSHE.
  • This can be measured by conversations with staff and through completion of questionnaires.

PSHE Personal, Social and Health Education is a subject through which pupils develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to keep themselves healthy and safe, and prepare for life and work in modern Britain. Our lessons aims to develop skills and attributes such as resilience, self-esteem, risk-management, team working and critical thinking in the context of learning.

At Junction Farm, we have opted to implement the Jigsaw Curriculum. This offers a comprehensive, progressive programme for Primary PSHE including statutory Relationships, and Health Education.

We have a positive approach to healthy relationships and health Education. The curriculum is also designed to develop emotional literacy and social skills.

Our lesson structure takes the form of 6 parts and looks like this:

Part 1: Connect us – This is a game or activity designed to be fun and inclusive, building and maximising social skills. It engenders positive relationships and enhances collaborative learning.

Part 2: Calm me – This section of the piece helps children gain awareness of the activity in their minds, relaxing them and quietening their thoughts and emotions to a place of optimum learning capacity.

Part 3: Open my mind – The reticular activating system of the brain filters the many stimuli entering the child’s mind at any given time. It is designed only to allow in that which is significant.

Part 4: Tell me or show me – This section of the Piece (lesson) is used to introduce new information, concepts and skills, using a range of teaching approaches and activities.

Part 5: Let me learn – Following Piaget’s learning model, after receiving new information/concepts, children need to manipulate, use, and play with that new information in order for it to make sense to them and for them to ‘accommodate’ it into their existing learning.

Part 6: Help me reflect -Throughout Jigsaw, children are encouraged to reflect on their learning experiences and their progress. By reflecting, children can process and evaluate what they have learnt, which enables them to consolidate and apply their learning.


Science

What do we want our children to walk away with at the end of the year?

  • Promote an enjoyment for science
  • Increased confidence when working scientifically
  • Full implementation of Science NC across KS1/2
  • Develop access to science beyond statutory National Curriculum

Curriculum Implementation:

How will we do this?

  • Quality first teaching with opportunity for CPD.
  • Monitoring of the quality of teaching through work scrutiny, planning, acquisition of skills and pupil voice.
  • Extra curricula activities (Science Quiz, Gliders club, Science club)
  • Develop progression of skills, knowledge and understanding document
  • Data analysis
  • Introduce Working Scientifically at the start of every new school year for all year groups

 

Curriculum Impact:

What do we want the impact to be?

  • Greater awareness of where each skill/topic fits into the bigger picture of Science NC (both children and adults)
  • Evidence of the progression of skills in books.
  • To gain experience and skills, drawing on the support of expertise.
  • Children to enthusiastically be a part of and discuss their learning journey, using enriched vocabulary and discussion of skill.
  • High attainment and progress for all children, supported through relevant intervention.
  • Quality evidence of work across school on display and on social media: share with parents and stakeholders.
  • More children achieving Mastery

Spanish

Spanish Curriculum

Curriculum Intent:

What do we want our children to walk away with at the end of the year?

  • To have knowledge and understanding of the world around them
  • Gain insight in to other cultures and ways of life
  • Value differences and break down barriers and prejudices
  • Gain skills and confidence to communicate verbally and non-verbally in a foreign language
  • Children are more open to opportunities of working and travelling abroad

Curriculum Implementation:

How will we do this?

  • Quality first teaching with many opportunities for CPD
  • Theory lesson as well as practical lessons
  • Monitoring of the quality of teaching through work scrutiny, planning, acquisition of skills and pupil voice
  • Annual Spanish day
  • Develop progression of skills, knowledge and understanding document
  • Data analysis

Curriculum Impact:

What do we want the impact to be?

  • Evidence of the progression of skills in Spanish books.
  • High attainment and progress for all children, supported through relevant intervention.
  • Quality evidence of work across school on display
  • More children achieving Mastery
  • Gain experiences and skills drawing on the support of expertise
  • Children to enthusiastically be a part of and discuss their learning journey, using enriched vocabulary and discussion of skill.

RE

VALUE STATEMENT

At Junction Farm Primary School we value R.E. because; it promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society. -it prepares pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.

Aims and purposes of Religious Education

RE at Junction Farm Primary School provides children with the opportunity to:

  • Develop their knowledge and understanding of, and their ability to respond to, Christianity and other major world religions represented in Great Britain
  • Explore issues within and between faiths to help them understand and respect different religions beliefs values and traditions
  • Consider questions of meaning and purpose in life from beginning to end
  • Learn about religious and ethical teaching, enabling them to make reasoned judgements on religious and moral issues
  • Develop their sense of identity and belonging, preparing them for life as citizens in a plural society
  • Develop a positive attitude towards other people, respecting their right to hold different beliefs from their own, and towards living in a society of diverse religions.

Legal Requirements

Our school curriculum for RE meets the requirements of the 1988 Education Reform Act (ERA). The ERA stipulates that Religious Education is compulsory for all children, including those in the reception class who are less than five years old.

The ERA allows parents to withdraw their child from RE classes if they so wish, although this should only be done once the parents have given written notice to the school governors. The ERA also allows teachers to refuse to teach RE, but only after they have given due notice of their intention to the school governors. Our school RE curriculum meets all the requirements set out in the Stockton-on-Tees Agreed Syllabus document 2008-2013. School had adopted the Stockton New Agreed Syllabus. The ERA states that the R.E syllabus should reflect the fact that the religious traditions in Great Britain are in the main Christian and that it should, at the same time, take account of the teachings and practises of other major religions.

R.E at Junction Farm.

The teaching of RE allows children both to learn about religious traditions and to reflect on what the religious ideas and concepts mean to them. Our teaching enables children to extend their own sense of values and promotes their spiritual growth and development.

We encourage children to think about their own views and values in relation to the themes and topics studied in the RE curriculum. The RE curriculum forms an important part of our school’s spiritual, moral and social teaching. It also promotes education for citizenship.

Children are encouraged to build on their own experiences and extend their knowledge and understanding of religious traditions. Direct experience comes from organised visits to local places of worship and visits from representatives of local religious groups who come into school and talk to the children.

At each Key Stage a programme of study sets out what pupils should be taught.

Lesson content is based upon the Stockton on Tees LA’s Agreed Syllabus and is supported by the QCA schemes of work. Lesson content may be adapted to meet the needs of individual classes or to make links with other subject areas.

RE Long Term Plan